I like my underwear. A lot. Some of the pictures may be mine and will be stated so. The rest are borrowed and duly recognized. Texts will most of the time be mine, but when not it will be referenced.
So, you like your underwear too?


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Sep 19, 2014
@ 1:13 pm
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(Source: maihesiem, via feanorian)


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Sep 11, 2014
@ 6:49 pm
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Lots of war happening at Forest Park these days….

Lots of war happening at Forest Park these days….


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Jun 24, 2014
@ 8:45 am
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s-hayashi:

Parrhesia : a journal of critical philosophy ISSUE 19
Tristan Garcia, Pierre Klossowski, Quentin Meillassoux, etc
ISSUE 19 FULL  PDF

 PAST ISSUES ISSUE 07-18 PDF↓
18 / 17 / 16 / 15 / 14 / 13 / 12 / 11 / 10 / 09 / 08 / 07

s-hayashi:

Parrhesia : a journal of critical philosophy ISSUE 19

Tristan Garcia, Pierre Klossowski, Quentin Meillassoux, etc

ISSUE 19 FULL  PDF

PAST ISSUES ISSUE 07-18 PDF↓

18 / 17 / 16 / 15 / 14 / 13 / 12 / 11 / 10 / 09 / 08 / 07

(via s-hayashi)


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Apr 2, 2014
@ 11:59 pm
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4 notes

When one man, for whatever reason, has the opportunity to lead an extraordinary life, he has no right to keep it to himself

— Jacques-Yves Cousteau (via mandaflewaway)


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Mar 24, 2014
@ 9:45 am
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386 notes

(via chupamichorizo)


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Mar 9, 2014
@ 4:07 pm
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I am He!

"Mind, nor intellect, nor ego, feeling;

Sky nor earth nor metals am I.

I am He, I am He, Blessed spirit, I am He!

No birth, no death, no caste have I;

Father, mother, have I none.

I am He, I am He, Blessed spirit, I am He!

Beyond the flights of fancy, formless am I,

Permeating the limbs of all life;

Bondage I do not fear; I am free, ever free.

I am He, I am He, Blessed spirit, I am He!”

Shankaracharya

( 788 AD - 820 AD )

(Source: ashramof1, via granosdegranada)


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Feb 16, 2014
@ 10:39 pm
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269 notes

(via deatheat3r)


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Feb 8, 2014
@ 8:34 pm
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Capitalist production collects the population together in great centres, and causes the urban population to achieve an ever-growing preponderance. This has two results. On the one hand it concentrates the historical motive power of society; on the other hand, it disturbs the metabolic interaction between man and the earth, i.e. it prevents the return to the soil of its constituent elements consumed by man in the form of food and clothing; hence it hinders the operation of the eternal natural condition for the lasting fertility of the soil. Thus it destroys at the same time the physical health of the urban worker, and the intellectual life of the rural worker. But by destroying the circumstances surrounding that metabolism, which originated in a merely natural and spontaneous fashion, it compels its systematic restoration as a regulative law of social production, and in a form adequate to the full development of the human race. In agriculture, as in manufacture, the capitalist transformation of the process of production also appears as a martyrology for the producer; the instrument of labour appears as a means of enslaving, exploiting, and impoverishing the worker; the social combination of labour processes appears as an organized suppression of his individual vitality, freedom, and autonomy. The dispersal of the rural workers over large areas breaks their power of resistance, while concentration increases that of the urban worker. In modern agriculture, as in urban industry, the increase in the productivity and the mobility of labour is purchased at the cost of laying waste and debilitating labour-power itself. Moreover, all progress in capitalist agriculture is a progress in the art, not only of robbing the worker, but of robbing the soil; all progress in increasing the fertility of the soil for a given time is a progress towards ruining the more long-lasting sources of that fertility. The more a country proceeds from large-scale industry as the background of its development, as in the case of the United States, the more rapid is this process of destruction; Capitalist production, therefore, only develops the techniques and the degree of combination of the social process of production by simultaneously undermining the original sources of all wealth—the soil and the worker.

— Capital vol. 1, Chapter 15: Machinery and Large-Scale Industry, Section 10: Agriculture, p.637-8 (via lovevoltaireusapart)


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Jan 31, 2014
@ 8:37 am
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Jan 27, 2014
@ 12:00 pm
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146 notes

curioos-arts:

"Chaman" by Antonio Mora (Spain)

Numbered Art Print by @Curioos from $25

> http://www.curioos.com/shop/product/chaman


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Jan 27, 2014
@ 7:53 am
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32,657 notes

(Source: florelty, via castlesandsunshine)


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Jan 25, 2014
@ 4:52 pm
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3,699 notes

We read books to find out who we are. What other people, real or imaginary, do and think and feel… is an essential guide to our understanding of what we ourselves are and may become.

—  Ursula K. Le Guin (via radagast)

(Source: voiceless-point-of-view, via radagast)


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Jan 22, 2014
@ 10:40 pm
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3,036 notes

(Source: tomorrowandbeyond, via radagast)


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Jan 15, 2014
@ 4:44 pm
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#urbandeath

#urbandeath


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Jan 11, 2014
@ 12:00 pm
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24 notes

We will say of pure immanence that it is A LIFE, and nothing else. It is not immanence to life, but the immanent that is in nothing is itself a life. A life is the immanence of immanence, absolute immanence: it is complete power, complete bliss.

— Gilles Deleuze, Immanence: A Life (via lovevoltaireusapart)